It's time to reinvent management. You can help.
HCL Technologies overhauled its annual business planning process, turning it into an opportunity for a) grooming future leaders, b) pushing the envelope of organizational transparency, and c) leveragi
Story by Shubhi Mittal on October 30, 2013
A stressed out small businessman learns, the hard way, the importance of a work place where people are energized and motivated by working the way that works for them.
Story by Henry Stewart on July 21, 2010
Most managers manage by telling their workforce what to do, without realising that telling them what to do actually destroys their ability to do it.Telling people what to do creates the resistance tha
Story by Peter A Hunter on November 21, 2010
A humble confession: I'm bored. As mind-implodingly, soul-suckingly, spirit-munchingly bored of business as Jason Voorhees probably is of Friday the 13th. Let me explain why, via a tiny theory. Porter's five forces , the 5 "C"s of marketing ? Forget it. I'd suggest that today, nothing characterizes...
Blog by Umair Haque on December 9, 2010
The traditional directive style of leadership has been part of our organisational lives because it serves an important purpose.
Story by Joris Luijke on December 3, 2011
It's one of the toughest—and most important—questions in business: How do you mobilize and unleash the best gifts of every single person in your organization? And how do you create an environment and systems for work that ignite extraordinary passion, imagination, and initiative? Few leaders would...
Blog by Polly LaBarre on February 15, 2011
Community Building 2.0 is a new core practice within companies to exploit the diversity of passion and pride among the current employees to create organizations that are deserving of their passion and
Hack by Malcolm O'Neal on July 17, 2013
I propose that the transformation of the 20th century into the 21st be the Age of Answers to the Age of Questions.  While answers are important, it’s more important to know what qu
As a reverse fairy tale for the CEO set, the reality television program Undercover Boss is fascinating, not so much in the witness-to-a-train- wreck mode of the rest of the genre, but because it is so revealing of our conflicted relationship with "the boss." The premise of the show—that the only way to get a clue about what's really going on in his (or her) organization, is for the boss to go undercover on the front lines—is all too often the actual reality in organizations of any size. Yet, at the same time, the view of the boss as the ultimate authority with the heroic power to swoop in and save the day—whether that means paying down a mortgage, granting an instant promotion, or banishing a reviled policy—holds sway in real life as well as on "reality" TV.
Blog by Polly LaBarre on March 5, 2012

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