It's time to reinvent management. You can help.
As a reverse fairy tale for the CEO set, the reality television program Undercover Boss is fascinating, not so much in the witness-to-a-train- wreck mode of the rest of the genre, but because it is so revealing of our conflicted relationship with "the boss." The premise of the show—that the only way to get a clue about what's really going on in his (or her) organization, is for the boss to go undercover on the front lines—is all too often the actual reality in organizations of any size. Yet, at the same time, the view of the boss as the ultimate authority with the heroic power to swoop in and save the day—whether that means paying down a mortgage, granting an instant promotion, or banishing a reviled policy—holds sway in real life as well as on "reality" TV.
Blog by Polly LaBarre on March 5, 2012
In October, 2012, iHire transitioned its culture to a Results Only Work Environment (ROWE), which is a management philosophy in which the focus comes off where, when and how long employees are working
Story by Lisa Shuster on December 26, 2013
As we push just about everything into the cloud, and advancements in technology shrink or eliminate traditional barriers for people to interact and exchange value, the "trustworthiness stool" presents
Hack by Aaron Anderson on August 17, 2012
When Henri Cartier Bresson described his photography, he said "There is nothing in this world that does not have a decisive moment".
Barrier by David Mason on July 27, 2010
“Leadership days”? These would involve rearranging the organisation for a day so that managers can relinquish control to an employee one level down in the hierarchical structure.
Hack by Keshal Sookha on October 18, 2011
Here at the MIX we believe that great ideas can come from anybody and anywhere in the world—as long as you're open and clever enough to ask for them. We're not sure how clever we are, but we're asking. We want YOUR great ideas when it comes to reinventing management. That's what the MIX is designed...
Blog by Polly LaBarre on May 14, 2010
We celebrate failure. Everyone says that but we really mean it. We really celebrate failure - we cheer, shout, applaud and stamp our feet when people in our company make mistakes.
Story by Pete Burden on January 18, 2011

Pages