It's time to reinvent management. You can help.
Most economic theories (and many managers) assume that the best way to get what you want from workers is give them the right financial incentives. But most real people have lots of reasons for working besides just making money. They work to have fun, to socialize with others, to challenge...
Blog by Tom Malone on April 8, 2010
Since I suspect many of you won’t have a whole day to spare reading almost 100 Human Capital M-Prize entries , I’ve put together something of a highlight reel for you. My hope is that this will save you some time while also uncovering some possible hack zones for further study during the Hackathon...
Blog by Chris Grams on March 21, 2011
Some say with relief that the old economy’s gone. Other’s say that new markets may never emerge.
Hack by Ellen Weber on September 4, 2011

MIX Maverick Daniel Pink talks about the importance of listening to your own voice and getting a better sense of what you're truly good at, as well as surrounding yourself with people who share your values and perspective.

Porter's Five Forces Model has been used in MBA level and other business courses on college campuses since it was invented by Michael Porter just over 30 years ago.
Hack by Aaron Anderson on June 25, 2010
What does it take to craft a career that is likely to stand the test of time? In my new book The Shift: the future of work is already here , I talk a great deal about the five forces that will shape work and careers: ever greater globalization of innovation and talent; the development of ever more...
Blog by Lynda Gratton on September 12, 2011
Manonamission.blogspot.com is a great collection of corporate mission statements. I recently used its search function to find examples of companies that prominently and publicly state something close to "people are our most important asset." Here's a partial list: Nestlé, Procter & Gamble, Land...
Blog by Andrew McAfee on August 25, 2010

Too many organizations are operating with a terminally creaky design for unleashing human potential, says Dan Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us. Our newest MIX Maverick, Pink describes what's wrong with how we think about what makes people tick—and how to rethink what helps them soar.

Organizations that thrive over the long run, in good times and bad, pay explicit attention to all these issues. Three of them, though, seem particularly crucial as we think about new challenges confronting us today.
Blog by Gary Hamel on October 11, 2011

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