It's time to reinvent management. You can help.
Never before has leadership been so critical, and never before has it seemed in such short supply. That's why we're delighted to announce the Leaders Everywhere Challenge today. The second leg of the 2012-13 HBR/McKinsey M-Prize calls for real-world case studies and bold hacks that demonstrate how we can dramatically expand the leadership capacity of all of our organizations by both redistributing power in a way that gives many more individuals an opportunity to lead, and equipping and energizing people to lead even when they lack formal authority.
As a reverse fairy tale for the CEO set, the reality television program Undercover Boss is fascinating, not so much in the witness-to-a-train- wreck mode of the rest of the genre, but because it is so revealing of our conflicted relationship with "the boss." The premise of the show—that the only way to get a clue about what's really going on in his (or her) organization, is for the boss to go undercover on the front lines—is all too often the actual reality in organizations of any size. Yet, at the same time, the view of the boss as the ultimate authority with the heroic power to swoop in and save the day—whether that means paying down a mortgage, granting an instant promotion, or banishing a reviled policy—holds sway in real life as well as on "reality" TV.
Blog by Polly LaBarre on March 5, 2012
Quitting email is the first step into a new dimension of communications energized by organic collaboration where we share leadership.
Hack by Kim Spinder on July 13, 2013
The purpose of this project is to analyze the relationship between virtues, sense of humor and organizational outcomes and to propose a tentative framework of relationships.
Hack by Salvatore Moccia on August 5, 2010
Our current leadership paradigm divides people into two groups: leaders and followers.
Hack by David Marquet on December 9, 2011
We live in a world where never before has leadership been so necessary but where so often leaders seem to come up short. Our sense is that this is not really a problem of individuals; this is a problem of organizational structures—those traditional pyramidal structures that demand too much of too few and not enough of everyone else.
Blog by Gary Hamel on May 24, 2013
A stressed out small businessman learns, the hard way, the importance of a work place where people are energized and motivated by working the way that works for them.
Story by Henry Stewart on July 21, 2010

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