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Create internal markets for ideas, talent & resources

“Organizations need a resource allocation process that more accurately mimics the selection pressures of a real market.”

Funding decisions in corporations are usually made at the top and are heavily influenced by political factors. That’s why companies over-invest in the past and underfund the future. By contrast, resource allocation in a market-based system like the New York Stock Exchange is decentralized and apolitical. While markets are obviously vulnerable to short-term distortions, in the long run they’re better than big organizations at getting the right resources behind the right opportunities. To make resource allocation more flexible and dynamic, companies must create internal markets where legacy programs and new projects compete on an equal footing for talent and cash.

48 Stories
71 Hacks
5 Barriers

Create internal markets for ideas, talent & resources

“Organizations need a resource allocation process that more accurately mimics the selection pressures of a real market.”

Funding decisions in corporations are usually made at the top and are heavily influenced by political factors. That’s why companies over-invest in the past and underfund the future. By contrast, resource allocation in a market-based system like the New York Stock Exchange is decentralized and apolitical. While markets are obviously vulnerable to short-term distortions, in the long run they’re better than big organizations at getting the right resources behind the right opportunities. To make resource allocation more flexible and dynamic, companies must create internal markets where legacy programs and new projects compete on an equal footing for talent and cash.

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Innovation should be the most enjoyable form of work, but the project modality leaches all joy from it: deadline pressure, boss-driven scope, and a team made up of "the usual suspects".
Story by Jeremy Clark on May 11, 2010
Build and foster shared learning environments where employees can openly share knowledge, best-practices and tools.
Hack by Malte Holm on April 16, 2010
To be successful and truly collaborative, knowledge-sharing systems require intuitive tools that connect people, reward participation, and align well with existing work and communication patterns.
Story by Doug Solomon on April 11, 2010

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